Do Whole Foods Make A Difference? - BodyMind Institute

Do Whole Foods Make A Difference?

By Melanie Taylor | Nutrition Tips

Nov 06

Average Reading Time: 4 min 14 sec

Our lives are so busy, and with that comes the need to “save time”. This has led to a trend of drive-throughs, fast meals, and ready-made packages. It is so easy to make this choice, so we can get our kids from event to event, fit meals between work and play, or the newest trend of skipping the dishes.

My question is what is this convenience costing us? Have you noticed how many cravings you have? Or how easy it is to overeat? The problem with all this convenience is that the time you save now can cost your health in the long run.

Why are whole foods good for you?

Eating whole foods in a natural state has been clinically proven to be the quickest way to eliminate cravings. This is because it is easier to become addicted to a refined, processed food than to a whole food in its natural state.

A refined food has lost its normal protective ratios of synergistic vitamins, minerals, and enzymes either by removal or destruction. This alters the way the refined food is metabolized in the body. For example, sugar acts more like a drug in the body than a food because it has been refined, devoid of its complementary nutrients. In its natural state, as sugar cane, it supplies B vitamins and many trace minerals including chromium.

When refined sugar is eaten, these nutrients must be supplied from body stores in order for the sugar to be metabolized. If these nutrient stores are depleted, alternate metabolic pathways of the body must be used, and this creates an imbalance in the body’s biochemistry. This imbalance results in altered signals to the brain, leading to craving and addiction.

(This applies not just to sugar but to all processed or refined foods and it also applies to whole food vitamins vs vitamins synthesized in a lab.)

According to WebMD, there are six reasons we should eat more whole foods, according to nutrition experts:

Phytochemicals

In the past 10 years, scientists have identified hundreds of biologically active plant-food components called phytochemicals (or phytonutrients).

They include the powerful antioxidant lycopene, a red-colored carotenoid found mainly in tomatoes; anthocyanins, a powerful antioxidant that gives deep blue color to berries; and pterostilbene, which appears to turn on a “switch” in cells that breaks down fat and cholesterol, and is found in blueberries and the Gamay and Pinot Noir varieties of grapes.

The only way to make sure you’re getting the phytochemicals we know about, as well as the ones we haven’t yet discovered or named, is to eat plant foods in their whole, unprocessed form (or ground, if they’re grains or seeds).

Nutrient Shortages

According to national survey results published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, almost a third of us get too little vitamin C; almost half get too little vitamin A; more than half get too little magnesium; and some 92% to 97% get too little fiber and potassium.

Yet, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), these particular nutrients help lower the risk of our major health problems: cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

What’s the easiest way to correct this nutrient shortage? Two words: whole foods. “Almost all of the shortfalls identified by this survey can be corrected by eating a balanced, mostly plant-based diet,” says AICR nutrition advisor Karen Collins, RD.

Good Fats

When you eat a diet made up mostly of whole foods, it’s easier to decrease the bad-for-you fats (trans fats and saturated fats) often added to processed foods and fast food. At the same time, it’s easier to emphasize the “good” fats (omega-3s from fish and plants, and monounsaturated fat from plant sources).

Fiber

Most whole-plant foods are rich in fiber; many processed foods, junk foods, and fast foods are not. Fiber helps your health in all sorts of ways; keeps the GI tract moving, helps you feel full faster, and it helps fight heart disease and diabetes.

“Foods are a better way to get fiber than supplements. You get the whole package,” says Martin O. Weickert, MD, of the German Institute of Human Nutrition. That’s because most plant foods have both types of fiber (soluble and insoluble).

Eating fiber-rich foods is linked to control of blood sugar, blood lipids (fats), and weight in adults, according to researchers from the Georgia Prevention Institute who recently did a study on whole-grain foods and abdominal fat in teenagers.

Fewer "Extras"

Whole foods are as nature made them, without added fat, sugar, or sodium. Eating more whole foods will help you cut down on calories from the added fats and sugars we get from processed and fast foods.

Whole Grains

You might think the benefits of whole grains have mostly to do with fiber, but there’s so much more than that. “Whole grains are rich in a myriad of vitamins, minerals and phytochemical compounds that, alone or in combination, are likely to have significant health benefits that are beyond that from dietary fiber,” notes Simin Liu, MD, ScD, a researcher and professor of epidemiology at the University of California - Los Angeles.

6 Ways to Add Whole Foods to Your Diet

So just how do you go about getting more whole foods in your diet? Here are six simple steps to take:

  • Choose products with 100% whole grains whenever possible.
  • Replace half the white flour called for in your baking recipes with whole-wheat flour. Also, use half the amount of sweetener when you can.
  • Eat lots of fresh vegetables and fruits. Try to include them in almost every meal and snack.
  • Include beans in your meals and snacks more often. They are a great source of plant protein, fiber, phytochemicals, and other nutrients.
  • Eat fewer convenience and processed foods. They’re often loaded with added fat, sugar, salt, and additives.
  • Don’t forget your beverages. Go for non-sugary options such as water, mineral water, green tea (iced or hot).

Looking for an easy resource for simple recipes to try?

Article by Melanie Taylor, Guest Blogger for the BodyMind Institute

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About the Author

A wife, mother, friend, volunteer and Life and Wellness Coach, Melanie is originally from Cranbrook, BC. She has lived in many places around the world before moving to Airdrie, AB in 2005 with her husband and children. Her core value is being in service to others. She brings this to life with three simple things: be honest, be generous and be kind. She believes in the power of balancing the mind, body and soul to live an authentic life of wellness. Empowering her clients to find their own wellness is her number one goal. Melanie's professional background includes 25+ years in corporate business. Throughout her career as a corporate trainer and coach, Melanie focused on training, development, and coaching a diverse demographic of individuals to support their career development and personal growth. Melanie found more and more that stress and wellness was holding people back from their potential. She trained in Integrated Health Coaching, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Coaching Grow Model and Situational Leadership. She continues to attends training workshops on a wide variety of topics, such as emotional intelligence, building community impact, personal wellness, and wellness in the workplace to keep the learning alive and provide her clients with a strong tool kit. Melanie chose to become a member of the International Coach Federation (ICF) because of their aligned commitment to maintaining and promoting excellence in coaching. ICF expects all members and credentialed coaches to adhere to the elements and principles of ethical conduct: to be competent and integrate ICF Core Competencies effectively in their work. Find Melanie online: lifeofwellness.ca/

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